Category Archives: Review Books

Recent Goings On

So much has been happening and I’ve not kept my faithful readers abreast of it all.

First, thanks to those of you who have stuck with this blog during its dormancy.

Second, I’ve received a couple of books over the past few months for review. Yes, I still plan to review books when I have the time. My Twitter followers have been made aware of these but my blog readers have not.

Wipf & Stock sent along Kevin Giles’ The Rise and Fall of the Complementarian Doctrine of the Trinity. I was made aware of this volume from a post on Scot McKnight’s blog. The material he quoted had Giles quoting Denny Burk so I naturally tracked the original material down and found that Giles was taking Burk out of context and misrepresenting him. Burk confirmed as much on Twitter when I brought it up to McKnight. So I’m looking forward to a more than likely scathing review of this book. I’ve admitted to being unnecessarily harsh to Giles’ work in the past but then I reread it or read something new and think that maybe it was necessary.

The other volume I received for review came courtesy of Mohr Siebeck. It’s Benjamin Pacut’s Redescribing Jesus’ Divinity Through a Social Science Theory. Tim Bertolet had good things to say about it so I’m hopeful that it will be good.

Thirdly, in other news, Fortress Press has partnered with an organization called Givingtons and they’re running a ridiculously discounted sale on a bunch of books. I had initially ordered a copy of David Congdon’s The Mission of Demythologizing: Rudolf Bultmann’s Dialectical Theology. Okay, so this has a $99 list price. Amazon sells it for just under $70. They had the Kindle version available for like $7 for a while but I’ve never once read any of the Kindle volumes I own. I can’t see starting now. So I was pretty much out of luck with this one. Until this sale. I found out about it on Facebook from Congdon and proceeded to order his book for a paltry $9! I also added a book on Incarnation.

But then some wacky stuff started to happen. Two weeks after placing the order I emailed customer service to check on the status of the order since nothing had even been shipped. I was refunded the money for Congdon’s book with the explanation that they were out of stock and didn’t expect to receive any from the publisher. This was disappointing. But they assured me that they were sending the other book. I told them thanks, but no thanks, and canceled the entire order. The other volume was merely an add-on.

So I took to Twitter and lamented the state of affairs. I also emailed the customer service rep and asked why people who had ordered the book after I had received a copy while I had been declined. You see, I know for a fact that there were people who missed out on the initial sale and ordered during a second wave. They had received books while I had not. I was given an unsatisfactory answer. But Congdon was good enough to contact his people at Fortress and get to the bottom of it all. I ended up being contacted and told that they were getting a new batch and that I could order it again, this time with free shipping for my inconvenience! So that I did. I also added a book on a non-sacramental reading of John 6.

Fourthly, I got off Facebook. I had initially signed up to meet my wife. We met. We dated. We married. The end. I still have the account; I just deleted the app.

product_thumbnailFifthly, I’ve self-published a collection of book reviews on books about Christology. It’s called Christology in Review: A Layman’s Take on Books about Christology. You can purchase a copy here if you’re so interested. It’ll cost you $6. Almost all of these reviews are available for free on the blog. I have added a review essay of Bart Ehrman’s How Jesus Became God, which is a bit more detailed than the review I have on the blog. I’ve also slightly edited the content of the some of the reviews and have done my best to format them all similarly; at least where possible.

And that’ll just about do it for this update.

Oh, and I’m happy to note that my brother from another mother Fr Esteban Vázquez is back to blogging! It’s substantive stuff too; not drivel like this!

B”H

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Home Library/Office Tour

I wanted to do this for a while. I had some time today. One day I’ll get a good camera and give this thing some real production value.

B”H

In the Mail

I was quite pleased to receive a copy of The Greek-English New Testament: USB Fifth Revised Edition and New International Version from Zondervan. This takes the latest edition of the UBS Greek text and places it side-by-side with the NIV 2011. I’ll have some things to say about this volume in the not too distant future, especially as it compares to the NA27/RSV Greek-English New Testament from years past.

B”H

In the Mail

Bloomsbury sent along a copy of Mark, Manuscripts, and Monotheism: Essays in Honor of Larry Hurtado as well as an electronic copy of the third edition of Hurtado’s One God, One Lord. I’m particularly interested in the third and final section of the Festschrift, which has four essays on monotheism and early Jesus devotion (of particular interest is Richard Bauckham’s contribution!). Also, the third edition of One God, One Lord remains virtually unchanged apart from the addition of an epilogue in which Hurtado addresses the current state of research. Having already reviewed the second edition I’ll be focusing my attention almost exclusively on this added epilogue. These are exciting times for those interested in the questions concerning early Christology!

B”H

In the Mail

IVP Academic sent along a couple of titles for me to peruse. The first one, Ron Highfield’s The Faithful Creator: Affirming Creation and Providence in an Age of Anxiety, came last week. The other, Archie J. Spencer’s The Analogy of Faith: The Quest for God’s Speakability, arrived yesterday. The latter is party of the Strategic Initiatives in Evangelical Theology series. I wasn’t expecting either of these volumes and I can’t say that they intersect with my current studies, but I’ll skim through them and see if anything grabs my attention.

B”H

In the Mail (about a week ago)

Since I don’t really blog anymore I always forget to mention when I’ve received something good in the mail. But hopefully what I’m about to mention will get me back to blogging a little more than usual. About a week ago I received a copy of Crispin Fletcher-Louis’ Jesus Monotheism, Volume 1: Christological Origins: The Emerging Consensus and Beyond. Now I’ve been aware of this project since January of last year…

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…so I’ve been waiting patiently for its release. And after having received the first volume I’ve learned that it’s gone from a proposed two volumes to four! In any event, I’ve started to read it and it promises to be a very helpful resource and a welcome addition to the ever-growing body of literature on the origins of a divine Christology.

B”H

In the Mail

I went away for a few days last week and neglected to mention that Lexham Press sent along the first three volumes of Geerhardus Vos’ Reformed Dogmatics for review. These are slim books with the volumes on Theology Proper and Christology coming in at around 250 pages each while the volume on Anthropology is about 150 pages. This is a welcome change from the systematic theology sets I’m used to.

I’ve also just received a copy of All that the Prophets Have Declared, edited by Matthew R. Malcolm. Matthew recently blogged summaries of the book’s contents so when he asked if anyone would be interested in reviewing the book I naturally jumped at the chance.

B”H