Category Archives: Review Books

Home Library/Office Tour

I wanted to do this for a while. I had some time today. One day I’ll get a good camera and give this thing some real production value.

B”H

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In the Mail

I was quite pleased to receive a copy of The Greek-English New Testament: USB Fifth Revised Edition and New International Version from Zondervan. This takes the latest edition of the UBS Greek text and places it side-by-side with the NIV 2011. I’ll have some things to say about this volume in the not too distant future, especially as it compares to the NA27/RSV Greek-English New Testament from years past.

B”H

In the Mail

Bloomsbury sent along a copy of Mark, Manuscripts, and Monotheism: Essays in Honor of Larry Hurtado as well as an electronic copy of the third edition of Hurtado’s One God, One Lord. I’m particularly interested in the third and final section of the Festschrift, which has four essays on monotheism and early Jesus devotion (of particular interest is Richard Bauckham’s contribution!). Also, the third edition of One God, One Lord remains virtually unchanged apart from the addition of an epilogue in which Hurtado addresses the current state of research. Having already reviewed the second edition I’ll be focusing my attention almost exclusively on this added epilogue. These are exciting times for those interested in the questions concerning early Christology!

B”H

In the Mail

IVP Academic sent along a couple of titles for me to peruse. The first one, Ron Highfield’s The Faithful Creator: Affirming Creation and Providence in an Age of Anxiety, came last week. The other, Archie J. Spencer’s The Analogy of Faith: The Quest for God’s Speakability, arrived yesterday. The latter is party of the Strategic Initiatives in Evangelical Theology series. I wasn’t expecting either of these volumes and I can’t say that they intersect with my current studies, but I’ll skim through them and see if anything grabs my attention.

B”H

In the Mail (about a week ago)

Since I don’t really blog anymore I always forget to mention when I’ve received something good in the mail. But hopefully what I’m about to mention will get me back to blogging a little more than usual. About a week ago I received a copy of Crispin Fletcher-Louis’ Jesus Monotheism, Volume 1: Christological Origins: The Emerging Consensus and Beyond. Now I’ve been aware of this project since January of last year…

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…so I’ve been waiting patiently for its release. And after having received the first volume I’ve learned that it’s gone from a proposed two volumes to four! In any event, I’ve started to read it and it promises to be a very helpful resource and a welcome addition to the ever-growing body of literature on the origins of a divine Christology.

B”H

In the Mail

I went away for a few days last week and neglected to mention that Lexham Press sent along the first three volumes of Geerhardus Vos’ Reformed Dogmatics for review. These are slim books with the volumes on Theology Proper and Christology coming in at around 250 pages each while the volume on Anthropology is about 150 pages. This is a welcome change from the systematic theology sets I’m used to.

I’ve also just received a copy of All that the Prophets Have Declared, edited by Matthew R. Malcolm. Matthew recently blogged summaries of the book’s contents so when he asked if anyone would be interested in reviewing the book I naturally jumped at the chance.

B”H

In the Mail

The other night I came home to discover that my copy of Chris Tilling’s Paul’s Divine Christology had arrived. This is the Eerdmans edition with a foreword by Douglas Campbell. I had the privilege of viewing the proofs and providing some feedback. I look forward to seeing if and how that feedback was taken into consideration in the final printing.

I also received a copy of Adam Ployd’s Augustine, the Trinity, and the Church: A Reading of the Anti-Donatist Sermons from Oxford University Press for review. I’m looking forward to reading Ployd’s argument for Augustine’s ecclesiology being heavily indebted to his Trinitarian theology.

B”H