Category Archives: Random Thoughts

Not So Random Thought

I was just looking through one of my hard drives and found a folder of ebooks. iBooks allows you to upload the epub files so I added all that I had. One of the books was a MacArthur Study Bible. I went to 1 Corinthians 12-14 and perused some of the notes and it always amazes me how he seems to lose his exegetical marbles when anything remotely charismatic comes up. His comments are unconvincing to say the least. I just can’t wrap my head around how he can be such a faithful and consistent interpreter of the Scriptures elsewhere and then have this huge blindspot here. What happened to Johnny Mac to make him oppose the things of the Spirit so much? I guess only him and God know…

B”H

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It Ain’t the Haircut

I don’t regularly talk about my job on the blog. I guess I don’t regularly talk about anything anymore, but I often have clients ask me what’s the hardest type of haircut to do. The answer is that it isn’t as simple as there just being a hard type of cut. There’s a lot that factors into the degree of difficulty for literally any type of haircut. We have to deal with varying head shapes; varying textures of hair; irregular growth patterns; scars; skin conditions; and a host of other things that you wouldn’t normally think of.

For example, I can do the same haircut on the same client two weeks in a row and have it be more difficult the second time around because he came in with bed head or hair product already in his hair. Or I can have two friends come in and both request the same style of haircut but one has Asian hair, which tends to be thick and pin straight (generally accompanied by a very pale scalp underneath) and the other have very fine thin blonde hair. The style is the same but the way I have to go about achieving the end result is different. And for the record, in such an instance there is no way possible that both cuts could look the same.

But aside from physical factors such as head shape, hair type, or the premature application of hair products, there’s a decidedly psychological aspect to the task that can complicate things. Sometimes we have to deal with people who border on obsessive compulsiveness with their high level of pickiness. They’ll notice the most microscopic detail and insist that it be fixed only to go on and notice something else that isn’t to their satisfaction. Sometimes someone will sit down and be incredibly vague in describing what they want (e.g., they’ll say, “just give me a regular cut,” not knowing that “regular” is relative). Certain people are simply jerks and you’d rather not deal with them in general. Others make things awkward by doing things like staring directly into your eyes while you’re trimming their facial hair.

The bottom line is that it ain’t the type of haircut in and of itself that’s difficult; it’s all the things that go into doing it that is.

B”H

On Enduring Beliefs

God saved me nearly 16 years ago and in nearly 16 years of salvation my beliefs haven’t shifted a whole lot. Over the course of time I’ve been able to chip away some of the rough edges of certain things and a periphery doctrine or two may have changed but the core is the same. I’d attribute this to my formative years as a believer, which were spent reading the Scriptures for countless hours.

I didn’t come into the faith with all of my beliefs worked out. I came in knowing that I was guilty of sinning against God, that God provided the pardon for my guilt in Christ, and that I didn’t want to serve the devil any more. So as I read, and prayed, and fasted I came to believe what I understood the text to be saying. It didn’t happen over night. These beliefs weren’t the result of me parroting what my pastor said or jumping on the latest televangelist bandwagon. They were hard-earned beliefs.

Eventually I’d branch out and start to look at websites and books and I got interested in scholarship both ancient and modern. Some of that served to correct misunderstandings. Some of it caused a bit of confusion. Some of it was easily rejected because it was contrary to what was clear from Scripture. But that foundation laid for me in the Bible was always there.

Paul wrote to the Ephesians and spoke to them about moving onto maturity so that they’d no longer be tossed to and fro by the waves and carried about by every wind of doctrine. I’m all for the spirit of semper reformanda but some folks take it a little too far and reform their beliefs and practices with the discovery of every new thinker. At a certain point we have to know what we believe and why we believe it. So when I hear people talk about how much their beliefs have changed over time I inevitably wonder how much time went into formulating those beliefs in the first place.

B”H

Recent Goings On

So much has been happening and I’ve not kept my faithful readers abreast of it all.

First, thanks to those of you who have stuck with this blog during its dormancy.

Second, I’ve received a couple of books over the past few months for review. Yes, I still plan to review books when I have the time. My Twitter followers have been made aware of these but my blog readers have not.

Wipf & Stock sent along Kevin Giles’ The Rise and Fall of the Complementarian Doctrine of the Trinity. I was made aware of this volume from a post on Scot McKnight’s blog. The material he quoted had Giles quoting Denny Burk so I naturally tracked the original material down and found that Giles was taking Burk out of context and misrepresenting him. Burk confirmed as much on Twitter when I brought it up to McKnight. So I’m looking forward to a more than likely scathing review of this book. I’ve admitted to being unnecessarily harsh to Giles’ work in the past but then I reread it or read something new and think that maybe it was necessary.

The other volume I received for review came courtesy of Mohr Siebeck. It’s Benjamin Pacut’s Redescribing Jesus’ Divinity Through a Social Science Theory. Tim Bertolet had good things to say about it so I’m hopeful that it will be good.

Thirdly, in other news, Fortress Press has partnered with an organization called Givingtons and they’re running a ridiculously discounted sale on a bunch of books. I had initially ordered a copy of David Congdon’s The Mission of Demythologizing: Rudolf Bultmann’s Dialectical Theology. Okay, so this has a $99 list price. Amazon sells it for just under $70. They had the Kindle version available for like $7 for a while but I’ve never once read any of the Kindle volumes I own. I can’t see starting now. So I was pretty much out of luck with this one. Until this sale. I found out about it on Facebook from Congdon and proceeded to order his book for a paltry $9! I also added a book on Incarnation.

But then some wacky stuff started to happen. Two weeks after placing the order I emailed customer service to check on the status of the order since nothing had even been shipped. I was refunded the money for Congdon’s book with the explanation that they were out of stock and didn’t expect to receive any from the publisher. This was disappointing. But they assured me that they were sending the other book. I told them thanks, but no thanks, and canceled the entire order. The other volume was merely an add-on.

So I took to Twitter and lamented the state of affairs. I also emailed the customer service rep and asked why people who had ordered the book after I had received a copy while I had been declined. You see, I know for a fact that there were people who missed out on the initial sale and ordered during a second wave. They had received books while I had not. I was given an unsatisfactory answer. But Congdon was good enough to contact his people at Fortress and get to the bottom of it all. I ended up being contacted and told that they were getting a new batch and that I could order it again, this time with free shipping for my inconvenience! So that I did. I also added a book on a non-sacramental reading of John 6.

Fourthly, I got off Facebook. I had initially signed up to meet my wife. We met. We dated. We married. The end. I still have the account; I just deleted the app.

product_thumbnailFifthly, I’ve self-published a collection of book reviews on books about Christology. It’s called Christology in Review: A Layman’s Take on Books about Christology. You can purchase a copy here if you’re so interested. It’ll cost you $6. Almost all of these reviews are available for free on the blog. I have added a review essay of Bart Ehrman’s How Jesus Became God, which is a bit more detailed than the review I have on the blog. I’ve also slightly edited the content of the some of the reviews and have done my best to format them all similarly; at least where possible.

And that’ll just about do it for this update.

Oh, and I’m happy to note that my brother from another mother Fr Esteban Vázquez is back to blogging! It’s substantive stuff too; not drivel like this!

B”H

Why I Don’t Discuss Politics

The title of this post is actually not true. I do discuss politics. All the time in fact. I just don’t like to discuss politics. I think the main reason is that I’m a realist. Being a realist also makes me a political cynic. I have no confidence in the American political system (or any other political system of this world). I’ve come to believe that politicians of any party will promise whatever they can to get elected and then do very little to fulfill those promises unless those promises serve their own agendas and the agendas of those they serve.

And while I’m on that, I think all American politicians, regardless of what side of the aisle they sit on, serve a super wealthy elite . The two party system exists to convince us that we really have a choice. At the end of the day it’s the same folks calling the shots. My vote matters only in the sense that it makes me feel as if I’ve exercised a right. Well bully for me!

But here’s my real issue. When I discuss politics I see people who are optimistic and idealistic and who expect real and significant changes. I don’t think it’s wrong to be hopeful. I do think it’s naive to think that American politicians will bring them. At least if the changes we’re expecting are positive. It’s basically like this: the country is getting worse. It has been in decline for a long time. I don’t see things getting better in a real and significant way until the Messiah returns and ushers in God’s kingdom.

Does that mean we stop hoping for change? No! Does it mean we stop taking steps to affect change? No! To the contrary, we have to occupy until Jesus returns, but I’m not expecting the kinds of changes that I’d like to see until that day comes. If the present US presidential election teaches us anything it should be that bad leaders (and that’s what we’re going to be stuck with regardless of who wins!) are God’s judgment on an unfaithful nation.

B”H

Things I Hate

I hate Pandora. In theory it’s a cool idea for a music app but in reality it sucks. We put it on at work and it doesn’t matter what Christian music station I create, I inevitably end up hearing the same 10 songs many times over throughout the day. It’s vexing.

I hate that warm weather makes people, especially men, want to expose their feet. Put some socks on and save us all the disgust.

I hate that I don’t write as much as I used to. I’d love to say that I’ll make the time to write more but I know that I won’t. I hate that too. I had dreams of writing books but it doesn’t seem like that’s gonna happen any time soon, if ever.

I hate that I don’t read as much as I’d like to. I could read more. I’m just lazy. I have down time at work where I could be reading more but instead I’m looking at pictures on Instagram or watching YouTube. I also hate that I’ve grown so lazy.

I hate the fact that I always go back to junk food after losing weight and then inevitably put the weight back on. It’s amazing how disciplined I can be in my diet and then just throw it all away out of convenience (= laziness).

I hate other stuff too but this is what came to mind. Carry on with your day. I hope it’s not filled with stuff you hate.

B”H

Doers Do

If there’s one thing I’ve learned in all the years I’ve been involved in Christian ministry it’s that doers do. Plenty of people talk about what they’d like to do and never end up doing much of anything. Doers on the other hand do what it is they’d like to do and then talk about it afterwards.

I mentioned to my pastor and his wife the other night how a friend of a friend asked me how my life has changed since my ordination. I explained that it hadn’t. I’m doing all the same things that I was doing before I got ordained. Why? Because they need to get done.

I’m all for strategy and implementation but I’m the type who’d rather apologize than ask permission. In other words, when I see something needs doing, I do it. If I do it wrong then I’m quick to say I’m sorry and make the necessary corrections, but if I waited around for a green light then the thing might never get done.

I’ve come to know a lot of folks who wait for the proverbial green light and then make all kinds of excuses when the work is left unfinished. They’ll say that they were never told how to do the task. They’ll say that they were never given the go ahead to do the task after they’d been told how it should be done. They’ll say that someone or something got in the way of the task being done properly. Whatever the excuse, they’re not doers, which is why they don’t do.

I’m reminded of Paul’s exhortation to be doers of the word and not hearers only. Likewise, I think of James saying that faith is proved in actions. There’s no secret or mystery to ministry (well, there is, but I’m talking about the practical outworking of ministry). Just do it, to quote a Nike slogan.

B”H